27 Houseplants That Can Detox the Air in Your Home

27 Houseplants That Can Detox the Air in Your Home

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We are all concerned about keeping our home clean and free from dirt, grime, and germs, but what about airborne toxins? They usually seep from normal things in your very own home such as your carpeting and wooden furniture. Sometimes you can even smell them lingering around, but they are there none the less. Six of the most prevalent chemicals that can affect your air in the home are ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde, toluene, trichloroethylene, and xylene, all of which can contribute to sick building syndrome (a process in which a build up of these chemicals can begin negatively affecting your health).

There is a natural way of cleansing the invisible toxins from the air in your home, and it doesn’t come in a bottle–it comes in a plant pot! There are over two dozen different plants that you can place in your home or office that will actually cleanse the air of some or all of these chemicals and make your home fresher than ever before. These plants were used in the Clean Air Study by NASA in an effort to find better ways of turning carbon dioxide into oxygen in spacecraft and the International Space Station in addition to research performed by B.C. Wolverton.

Dwarf date palm (Phoenix roebelenii) – filters formaldehyde, toluene, and xylene

Areca palm (Dypsis lutescens) – filters toluene and xylene

Boston fern (Nephrolepis exaltata ‘Bostoniensis’) – filters formaldehyde, toluene, and xylene

Kimberly queen fern (Nephrolepis obliterata) – filters formaldehyde, toluene, and xylene

English ivy (Hedera helix) – filters benzene, formaldehyde, toluene, trichloroethylene, and xylene

Lilyturf (Liriope spicata) – filters ammonia, formaldehyde, toluene, and xylene

Spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum) – filters formaldehyde, toluene, and xylene

Devil’s ivy, Money plant (Epipremnum aureum) – filters benzene, formaldehyde, toluene, and xylene

Peace lily (Spathiphyllum ‘Mauna Loa’) – ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde, toluene, trichloroethylene, and xylene

Flamingo lily (Anthurium andraeanum) – ammonia, formaldehyde, toluene, and xylene

Chinese evergreen (Aglaonema modestum) – benzene and formaldehyde

Bamboo palm (Chamaedorea seifrizii) – filters formaldehyde, toluene, and xylene

Broadleaf lady palm (Rhapis excelsa) – filters ammonia, formaldehyde, toluene, and xylene

Variegated snake plant, mother-in-law’s tongue (Sansevieria trifasciata ‘Laurentii’) – filters benzene, formaldehyde, toluene, trichloroethylene, and xylene

Heartleaf philodendron (Philodendron cordatum) – filters formaldehyde

Selloum philodendron (Philodendron bipinnatifidum) – filters formaldehyde

Elephant ear philodendron (Philodendron domesticum) – filters formaldehyde

Red-edged dracaena (Dracaena marginata) – filters benzene, formaldehyde, toluene, trichloroethylene, and xylene

Cornstalk dracaena (Dracaena fragrans ‘Massangeana’) – filters benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene

Weeping fig (Ficus benjamina) – filters formaldehyde, toluene, and xylene

Barberton daisy (Gerbera jamesonii) – filters benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene

Florist’s chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium) – filters ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde, toluene, trichloroethylene, and xylene

Rubber plant (Ficus elastica) – filters formaldehyde

Dendrobium orchids (Dendrobium spp.) – filters toluene and xylene

Dumb cane (Dieffenbachia spp.) – filters toluene and xylene

King of hearts (Homalomena wallisii) – filters toluene and xylene

Moth orchids (Phalaenopsis spp.) – filters toluene and xylene

 

In addition to cleansing the air in the home, these plants are relatively low maintenance and do not require a lot of water or sunlight in order to thrive. According to NASA, having at least one plant per 100 sq ft of home space is optimal for effective air filtering. Do you have any of these these in your own home? Which plants do you find the most effective in cleansing your home’s air? Let us know what you think on our Facebook page or tweet us!

 

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Jonathan is a CSULB graduate with expertise in wielding the art of the written word. He has been writing professionally for many years in copywriting, content editing, branding, and journalism. Everyone has a story to tell, and Jonathan is able to bring it to life.